A Friday Afternoon or Where is my Stop? The Sunday Whirl #24

Sitting alone in his fearful church
with distorted myriad thoughts,
riding the bus in circles asking,
where the market is

Signs are indecipherable, Nahuan
of lost tribes, living in history …
concrete buildings on desert land,
hold faces of the past

As the bus continues on cobbled
pathways, adventure in his heart,
trying to remember, he overlooks
where the market is

Process notes: This is a true story of a poor fellow, who was on the bus with me Friday on the way home. Apparently, he kept forgetting where his stop was. When he did get off, the driver turned to me and said “pobrecito”, and proceeded to tell me the story. The poor fellow had been riding on the bus for a minimum of two hours to get to the market. The route is an hour, one way.

Nahuan: the language of the Nahuatl (Aztecas), many towns are named after the Nahuatl.
Pobrecito: poor thing (masculine)

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21 responses to “A Friday Afternoon or Where is my Stop? The Sunday Whirl #24

  1. A sweet story of confusion.

    Here is another example of confused English words: overlooks can mean not only “fails to see” , “forgets” etc but also what amounts to the opposite, “observes,” “watches”, “supervises” etc. – back to our recent discussion at Margo’s about “quite”!

    • I hadn’t thought about that, Viv. I guess being American I see “overlook” as an oversight, something missed. As for the word “quite”, I just had a discussion with a class Saturday as to its use. In Spanish it is used the same, one meaning is “bastante” meaning a lot. And “relativamente” meaning relatively, (not much). Thanks.

  2. A nicely told story Pamela and a good use of the wordle words.

  3. Sometimes one can’t see what is right in front of one’s eyes! Nice write, Pamela.

  4. Pam,
    Confusion on the part of that fellow. Appreciate your process notes as it made the story much clearer. An excellent example for creating your ‘own prompt’

    Hank

  5. Hank, he was obviously not all there, but I would never noticed if it wasn’t brought to my attention. Thanks.

  6. It sounds as if he has the starting of Alzhiemer’s or dementia. If he couldn’t remember where he was going or where to get off. Very sad.
    Lovely descriptive prose though.

  7. There but for the grace of God . . . .

  8. It is interesting that these words brought several of us Wordlers to the realm of confusion. This poor guy’s experience sounds like a strange, tangled dream. Thank goodness for the bus driver.

  9. nan, the bus driver was as nice as can be about the situation. When he told me “pobrecito” it was said with complete sympathy. I noticed you wrote in a similar vein. Interesting.

  10. Could be many stories behind this and reminds me of a few. As always you bring people to life. Remarkable.

  11. Loved this poem and the compassion of the bus driver. Thanks for the notes too which further explained. Well done. Poor man, indeed.

  12. It seems the fearful church is in his head, interesting phrasing. I keep going back to it. Thank you for sharing a bit of your day…I don’t ride the bus enough, those small human interactions open windows on worlds. Intriguing and engaging write.

  13. magicalmysticalteacher

    I sometimes get lost too, although not as severely as this poor guy!

    My Wordle 24

  14. I’ve been known to drive right past my own driveway because I’m thinking of other things. I have sometimes thought it was because I really didn’t want to go home. You make us all feel for the poor man and his confusion. Good poem and great use of the wordle words, Pamela,

    Elizabeth
    http://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/

  15. You told the story beautifully, Pamela. I love the direction you took the words. I can not seem to write anything this week. Hopefully next week.

I appreciate all comments.

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